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Pet Weaver Birds


The Weavers are small birds related to the finches.

These are seed-eating birds with rounded conical bills, most of which breed in sub Saharan Africa, with fewer species in tropical Asia and also in Australia. The weaver group is divided into the buffalo, sparrow, typical, and widow weavers. The males of many species are brightly coloured, usually in red or yellow and black, some species show variation in colour only in the breeding season.

Weaver birds, also known as weaver finches, get their name because of their elaborately woven nests, though some are notable for their selective parasitic nesting habits. The nests vary in size, shape, material used, and construction techniques from species to species. Materials used for building nests include fine leaf-fibers, grass, and twigs. Many species weave very fine nests using thin strands of leaf fiber, though some, like the buffalo-weavers, form massive untidy stick nests in their colonies, which may have several spherical woven nests within. The sparrow weavers of Africa build apartment-house nests, in which 100 to 300 pairs have separate flask-shaped chambers entered by tubes at the bottom. Most species weave nests that have narrow entrances, facing downward.

The weavers often breed in colonies. The birds build their nests together, often several to a branch. Usually the male birds weave the nests and use them as a form of display to lure prospective females. The weaver bird colonies may be found close to water bodies. They sometimes cause crop damage, notably the Red-billed Quelea, reputed to be the world's most numerous bird.


Weaver Bird Products & Weaver Bird Books






Weaver Bird Breeds


Weavers and Whydahs
Comoro Weaver
Grenadier Weaver
Madagascar Weaver
Napoleon Weaver
Orange Bishop Weaver
Paradise Whydahs
Pin tailed Whydah
Red headed Fody
Red shouldered Whydah
   






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